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Legendary value investors' secrets

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June 21, 2018

Books

Philip Fisher’s scuttlebutt method

For a man like Berkshire Hathaway chairman Warren Buffett who doesn’t personally own an iPhone, one wonders why he more than doubled Berkshire Hathaway’s holdings in Apple to about 2.5 per cent in January 2017. At that point, Mr Buffett owned US$17 billion worth of the tech giant’s stock In a CNBC report on 27

Benjamin Graham on dollar-cost averaging

In Chapter 5 (The Defensive Investor and Common Stocks) of The Intelligent Investor, Benjamin Graham, the father of value investing, touched on various aspects of defensive investment, among which was dollar-cost averaging, an application of a “formula investment”. Elaborating, he said: “The New York Stock Exchange has put considerable effort into popularizing its ‘monthly purchase

Seven stock investing mistakes to avoid: Pat Dorsey

It takes many great stock picks to make up for just a few big errors, says Pat Dorsey, author of The Five Rules for Successful Stock Investing. So even before one goes into any analysis process, care should be taken to avoid seven easily avoidable mistakes. Here is Pat Dorsey’s list of seven mistakes to

Benjamin Graham Theory Of Diversification

In investment, having a margin of safety itself is not sufficient.  Why is this so? Benjamin Graham, the founder of value investing, uses the simple basis of the insurance-underwriting business to explain the need for diversification. He said that  diversification is the companion of margin of safety. In other words, margin of safety and diversification

Margin of Safety: Secret of Sound Investment

Benjamin Graham (May 8, 1894 – September 21, 1976), the father of value investing, in his book, The Intelligent Investor, summed up the secret of sound investment in three words: margin of safety. Warren Buffett, Benjamin Graham’s most famous disciple, explained his mentor’s margin of safety concept this way (Source: The Superinvestors of Graham-and-Doddsville by

The Little Book of Common Sense Investing by John C. Bogle

In his letter dated February 27, 2015 (for FY2014) to Berkshire Hathaway shareholders, Warren Buffett says: “Rather than listen to their (advisors’) siren songs, investors – large and small – should instead read Jack Bogle’s The Little Book of Common Sense Investing. “Stock prices will always be far more volatile than cash-equivalent holdings. Over the long

Charlie Munger’s “lollapalooza effect” concept

In stock markets, we hear of this term called “lollapalooza effect”. In mid-2014, for example, when the stock of Apple plummeted at one stage by  40 per cent from a high of $700 to just below  $400, the cause was attributed in some quarters to the “lollapalooza effect”. In a June 2014  article , “Apple Stock Still

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